Our impact

  • The IRC provided schooling and educational opportunities to over 1 million girls and boys, and trained over 23,000 educators

    The IRC provided schooling and educational opportunities to over 1 million girls and boys, and trained over 23,000 educators
  • The IRC vaccinated over 364,000 children under the age of one against disease

    The IRC vaccinated over 364,000 children under the age of one against disease
  • Provided job-related skills training to 18,417 people

    Provided job-related skills training to 18,417 people
  • Of every £1 the IRC spends, more than 90p goes to programmes that directly benefit refugees and their communities.

    Of every £1 the IRC spends, more than 90p goes to programmes that directly benefit refugees and their communities.
  • Provided 16.1 million people with primary and reproductive health care

    Provided 16.1 million people with primary and reproductive health care
  • In addition to our longer-term programme work, the IRC has continued to respond to emergencies.

    In addition to our longer-term programme work, the IRC has continued to respond to emergencies.

International Rescue Committee UK was founded in 1997 as the European headquarters of the IRC global network. We raise funds for our overseas programmes, provide programme management and technical support, and carry out policy and advocacy work in the UK and Europe on issues affecting people caught up in conflict and disaster.

Our global impact

Thanks to the generosity of IRC supporters, more than 23 million people benefited from IRC programmes and those of our partner organisations in 2015 —nearly 5.5 million more individuals than we were able to reach in 2014.

In 2015, the IRC and our partner organisations: 

  • Helped more than 21 million people gain access to primary and reproductive health care.
     
  • Vaccinated more than 440,000 children under the age of one against measles.
     
  • Supported 2,384 clinics and health facilities that helped more than 315,000 women deliver healthy babies.
     
  • Supported more than 13,000 community health workers to treat pneumonia, malaria and diarrhea in children under age 5 and treated 186,000 children under the age of five for acute malnutrition.
     
  • Gave 2.6 million people access to clean drinking water or sanitation.
     
  • Provided schooling and educational opportunities to more than 1.3 million girls and boys; trained more than 54,000teachers and educators and supported 7,959 schools.
     
  • Provided counseling, care and support to more than 36,800 vulnerable children and trained 9,525 child protection workers.
     
  • Provided 24,555 families with parenting support.
     
  • Created 1,716 village savings and loan associations that benefited more than 38,000 members who saved a total of nearly$1.8 million.
     
  • Provided more than 14,900 farmers with agricultural or agribusiness training and more than 34,700 farmers with agricultural “inputs” and access to markets.
     
  • Provided job-related skills training (entrepreneurship, business and financial literacy, vocational training) to more than 27,000people.
  • Helped support or create 8,760 businesses.
  • Provided cash or asset transfers to 75,625 refugee and displaced individuals or households with a cash value of $11.8 million.
     
  • Counselled and provided essential services (healthcare, psycho-social support and legal aid) to more than 11,400 survivors of gender-based violence (GBV); trained more than 33,000 women, men and children in GBV prevention; reached more than750,300 women, men and children with community-based gender-based violence prevention efforts.
     
  • Offered legal assistance to more than 35,450 people through IRC-supported legal centers and mobile teams; trained 18,267people in the principles of human rights and protection; offered awareness raising sessions to some 192,000 people on preventing and responding to human rights abuses.
     
  • Trained over 25,800 people in the principles of governance, which means improving governments' ability to provide services and be accountable to the people they serve. Offered awareness raising sessions on governance and governance-related topics to more than 168,400 people.
     
  • In the United States, the IRC helped resettle 9,961 newly arrived refugees and provided services to promote self-reliance and integration to over 36,000 refugees, asylees, victims of human trafficking and other immigrants.
     
  • Through our Resettlement Support Center in Thailand, the IRC assisted 18,151 refugees who departed from camps and cities in East Asia to enter the United States and build new lives with help from the IRC and sister resettlement agencies.

Video: the IRC's impact in 2014

Responding to emergencies

In addition to our longer-term programme work, the IRC has continued to respond to emergencies. In recent years this has included crises in Iraq, Syria, South Sudan and the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa. 

Read more about our work in emergencies.

Advocating for change in Europe

However good our programmes are, in many cases they cannot address the underlying issues affecting the people we work with. To do this, advocacy work is essential to bring about changes in the policies and practices of local, national and international institutions. IRC-UK raises awareness and understanding of the countries in which we work. We bring our direct experience in the field to the attention of policymakers in order to influence the policies of UK and European institutions.

Read more about our advocacy work.

Our efficiency

Of every £1 the IRC spends, more than 90p goes to programmes and services that directly benefit refugees and communities affected by war or disaster. Find out more about how we spend our money.

Be a part of our work

Learn about the many ways you can help.


IRC-UK is a registered charity, number 1065972
Copyright © International Rescue Committee, 2012